Google Glass: what you need to know

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Back in early 2012, before the world had heard of Google Glass, the tech world was ablaze with rumours that the search giant was beavering away on augmented reality goggles.

As the days went by, it was clear that not only was this true, but that Google’s dream of wearable technology was far, far closer to release than anyone would have guessed.

Roll forward just over a year and the first versions are in the hands of developers who went into a lottery to fork out $1,500 for their own pair of spectacles.

But what exactly is Google Glass? Why is it attracting all this attention and what are the implications – both good and bad – of having a Google-eye view of the world?

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What is Google Glass?

Google Glass is an attempt to free data from desktop computers and portable devices like phones and tablets, and place it right in front of your eyes.

Essentially, Google Glass is a camera, display, touchpad, battery and microphone built into spectacle frames so that you can perch a display in your field of vision, film, take pictures, search and translate on the go.

What can Google Glass do?

As well as Google’s own list of features, the early apps for Google Glass provide a neat glimpse into the potential of the headset.

As well as photos and film – which require no explanation – you can use the Google hangout software to video conference with your friends and show them what you’re looking at.

You’ll also be able to use Google Maps to get directions, although with GPS absent from the spec list, you’ll need to tether Glass to your phone.

To do that, Google offers the MyGlass app. This pairs your headset with an Android phone. As well as sharing GPS data, this means messages can be received, viewed on the display, and answered using the microphone and Google’s voice-to-text functionality.

Google has given its Glass project a big boost by snapping up voice specialists DNNresearch.

That functionality will also bring the ability to translate the words being spoken to you into your own language on the display. Obviously you’ll need a WiFi connection or a hefty data plan if you’re in another country, but it’s certainly a neat trick if it works.

Third parties are also already developing some rather cool/scary apps for Google Glass – including one that allows you to identify your friends in a crowd, and another that allows you to dictate an email.

The New York Times app gives an idea how news will be displayed when it’s asked for: a headline, byline, appropriate image and number of hours since the article was published are displayed.

 

How much will Google Glass cost?

The Google Glass Explorer (the developer version being sent out now)costs $1,500 – around £985 or AU$1,449.

The consumer versions, which are expected to arrive by the end of 2013, are expected to be a little cheaper, although any actual prices remain speculative. They are unlikely to be super-cheap – but Google’s success with the Nexus 7 tablet may prompt the company to subsidise some of the cost.Image

 

 

 

MOCH NURIL LAZUARDI

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4 thoughts on “Google Glass: what you need to know

  1. i’m very curious about this thing, and i think this post can explain all of thing i want to know about google glass. great post!

  2. nice post
    This is helpful to know more about the latest technologies google. probably many who do not know about this but since this post so very helpful
    LINTANG 125150300111023

  3. yeah, thank you for reading , that thing is very cool, doesn’t it ? we can take a picture and video silently 🙂

  4. but it’s called illegal nuril lazuardi 😀

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